Join Me for the Genealogy Scan Along

From The Family Curator . . .

Do you have a family history photo book on your To Do List? Summertime is a great time to tackle this project, and more fun if you’re working with other people doing the same thing. Starting next week, I’ll be hosting a Genealogy Scan Along at The Family Curator website with tutorials and tips to create a family history photo book.

Source: Join Me for the Genealogy Scan Along

Mobile Photo Scanning – PhotoScan vs Photomyne

For years you’ve been saying you’re going to scan all the photos you have in shoeboxes in the basement. Now’s as good a time as any. There are a few smartphone apps that’ll help you with this so you don’t need to pay someone or drag out a scanner to do it, but Photomyne and Google’s recently released PhotoScan are the two top choices.

There are a number of mobile apps for digitizing documents. Although you can also use them for photos, they aren’t giving you the resolution needed for high-quality scans. Now we are beginning to see options for mobile photo scanning. This Lifehacker article describes and compares the top two photo scanning apps – PhotoScan and Phtomyne.

Details at Photo Scanning Showdown: PhotoScan vs Photomyne

Home for the Holidays: 7 Tips for Scanning Photos on the Go

With Thanksgiving approaching, you’re probably thinking about recipes or reservations or relatives—maybe all three. All of these are fine traditions, but if your Thanksgiving plans do involve going home for the holidays, you might want to take that opportunity to harvest photos for a family photo book.

Some great tips for scanning with your camera phone from Blurb. You might also want to check out the free Blurb app for iPhones and iPads to quickly and easily make your own photo books.

How to Scan Film and Negatives like a Pro

While you might be uninterested by the idea of text traveling through cables as signals, you should take interest in the fact that film and negatives do precisely the same thing. If it’s okay with you, I’d like to provide an overly simplistic definition of film scanning. Film scanning is nothing more than the conversion of highly processed animal skin (gelatin) and silver halide crystals into electronic signals. The job of a professional film scanner is to create electronic signals that carry as much of the information originally housed on your film as possible. Getting good information out of your film is the purpose of this article. Let’s make some electronic signals!

More information – and video demonstrations at How to Scan Film and Negatives like a Pro

SD Card Reader for iPad

Are you looking for an easy way to move photos from your digitial camera or scans from your Flip-Pal to your iPad for editing? Slide your SD car into this card reader and plug it into the charging port on your iPad. Turn on your iPad and your Photos app will open – ready for you to import and edit your scanned files.

The SD Card Reader/Adapter sells for $29 and can be purchased at Amazon or your nearest Apple store.