QromaScan: the World’s Smartest Photo Scanner

Designed with simplicity in mind, the QromaScan Lightbox and the QromaScan iOS app work together to form the world’s smartest photo scanner.

Tell it the date, place and people in your photos, and QromaScan tags your photos as it scans. You’ll end up with high quality searchable images that will organize themselves whenever you import them into your photo organization software. When you are done, it folds right back up like a book in a second.

QromaScan makes scanning and organizing your photos fast and easy.

They even have a slide scanner! Unfortunately QromaScan is only available for iOS devices.

 

Mobile Photo Scanning – PhotoScan vs Photomyne

For years you’ve been saying you’re going to scan all the photos you have in shoeboxes in the basement. Now’s as good a time as any. There are a few smartphone apps that’ll help you with this so you don’t need to pay someone or drag out a scanner to do it, but Photomyne and Google’s recently released PhotoScan are the two top choices.

There are a number of mobile apps for digitizing documents. Although you can also use them for photos, they aren’t giving you the resolution needed for high-quality scans. Now we are beginning to see options for mobile photo scanning. This Lifehacker article describes and compares the top two photo scanning apps – PhotoScan and Phtomyne.

Details at Photo Scanning Showdown: PhotoScan vs Photomyne

Searching for Santa with Siri

Search with Siri

A Siri search on a Mac

Did you know that Siri can search the web for more than just a nearby eatery? And, with the latest MacOS update, we now have Siri on our desktops too!

All you have to do is open Siri and ask to search the web for whatever you want to find. In this example, I’ve asked for a search in Flickr.com to find pictures of Santa Claus. You can see the results. If I want to download one of these images, all I do is select it and drag it from this panel to my desktop.

Siri also gives me options – like looking at more pictures in the Safari browser. The panel barely visible at the bottom of the Siri panel offers suggestions for other links and sources that could be helpful.

The Siri search on my iPad brought me lists of links but no actual images. Another option is to use my iOS device’s search box (swipe down the middle of the home screen to open it). I tapped the microphone icon at the right side of the search box and dictated my search. Siri presented several option buttons. I tapped the Search Web button and then chose the Images option. The search results included a glorious collection of Santas!

Siri is a great partner and my husband is slowly adjusting to the idea that there’s a very good reason I’m talking to my computer.

 

Home for the Holidays: 7 Tips for Scanning Photos on the Go

With Thanksgiving approaching, you’re probably thinking about recipes or reservations or relatives—maybe all three. All of these are fine traditions, but if your Thanksgiving plans do involve going home for the holidays, you might want to take that opportunity to harvest photos for a family photo book.

Some great tips for scanning with your camera phone from Blurb. You might also want to check out the free Blurb app for iPhones and iPads to quickly and easily make your own photo books.

How to Scan Film and Negatives like a Pro

While you might be uninterested by the idea of text traveling through cables as signals, you should take interest in the fact that film and negatives do precisely the same thing. If it’s okay with you, I’d like to provide an overly simplistic definition of film scanning. Film scanning is nothing more than the conversion of highly processed animal skin (gelatin) and silver halide crystals into electronic signals. The job of a professional film scanner is to create electronic signals that carry as much of the information originally housed on your film as possible. Getting good information out of your film is the purpose of this article. Let’s make some electronic signals!

More information – and video demonstrations at How to Scan Film and Negatives like a Pro

What happens to your digital world after you’re gone?

Got email? These days, our email accounts are just the tip of the iceberg in terms of our online presence. From bank accounts to Facebook, PayPal and more, a good chunk of our personal and financial lives are online.

If you fail to account for those digital assets in your estate plan, you risk burying your family or friends in red tape as they try to get access to and deal with your online accounts that may have sentimental, practical or monetary value.

One potential problem with failing to plan for these assets is that your executor will have a hard time tracking everything down. That could mean some of your assets are simply lost, says Kelly Pedersen, founder of Caissa Wealth Strategies in Minneapolis.

That also could put your estate at risk for hacking or fraud, Pedersen says. “Typically your PayPal is hooked up to your bank account. Same with your Amazon account — that’s hooked up to a credit card,” she says. If your executor doesn’t know about these accounts to close them, the accounts could get hacked without anyone knowing — ultimately your estate could be paying for the losses.

Andrea Coombes’ article – How to include your digital assets in your estate plan – describes what you need to do now.