Posted in Archives, News

World War I: Online

The Library of Congress has opened an online portal to their World War I collection.

Today we launched a comprehensive portal to its extensive holdings on the subject of World War I (1914–1918) as part of our commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the U.S. involvement in the war. The portal is a one-stop destination page for digitized versions of many of these assets.

These remarkable collections include recruitment and wartime information posters, photos from the front, manuscripts and papers of prominent figures such as General John J. “Black Jack” Pershing, newspapers that provided the first draft of the war’s history, maps of campaigns and battle lines, sound recordings of prominent leaders of the era, war-related sheet music, even early film treasures.

Along with extensive access to these rare materials, the portal will include links to the online version of the Library’s major new exhibition, “Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I,” which opens April 4.

In addition, the portal will feature articles from our blogs, written by Library curators who will offer unique insight into the collections and highlight stories and materials that are most revealing about the war, and America’s involvement in it—before, during and after its military participation.

Learn more at the LOC WWI portal site.

Posted in Archives

Naturalization Records – US and Canada

We now have a wonderful online resource for naturalization records! Lorine McGinnis Schulze has added NaturalizationRecords.com to her impressive Olive Tree Genealogy family of genealogy sites.

The Naturalization Records site has created a directory to free records for USA and Canada. You can find Passport Applications, Citizenship Certificates, Declarations of Intent, Alien Registrations and more. The site also points to substitute naturalization records like ships passenger lists, oaths of allegiance and voter registration lists.

One of the very nice things you’ll find at this site is help. When I clicked to look at Canadian records, I was presented with a page that presented descriptions of the different record sets along with suggestions on where to looks first. Lorine has spent a lot of time and effort describing the kind of information each database contains and offering tips on how to search them.

Olive Tree Genealogy

Posted in Toolbox

QromaScan: the World’s Smartest Photo Scanner

Designed with simplicity in mind, the QromaScan Lightbox and the QromaScan iOS app work together to form the world’s smartest photo scanner.

Tell it the date, place and people in your photos, and QromaScan tags your photos as it scans. You’ll end up with high quality searchable images that will organize themselves whenever you import them into your photo organization software. When you are done, it folds right back up like a book in a second.

QromaScan makes scanning and organizing your photos fast and easy.

They even have a slide scanner! Unfortunately QromaScan is only available for iOS devices.

 

Posted in Toolbox

Mobile Photo Scanning – PhotoScan vs Photomyne

For years you’ve been saying you’re going to scan all the photos you have in shoeboxes in the basement. Now’s as good a time as any. There are a few smartphone apps that’ll help you with this so you don’t need to pay someone or drag out a scanner to do it, but Photomyne and Google’s recently released PhotoScan are the two top choices.

There are a number of mobile apps for digitizing documents. Although you can also use them for photos, they aren’t giving you the resolution needed for high-quality scans. Now we are beginning to see options for mobile photo scanning. This Lifehacker article describes and compares the top two photo scanning apps – PhotoScan and Phtomyne.

Details at Photo Scanning Showdown: PhotoScan vs Photomyne